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November 16, 2015

Photographing Horses 101

Even though I have put my focus towards photographing people over the last year or two, equine photography will ALWAYS be my favorite! Combining the two and doing portraits of horses with their owners is my ultimate photography happiness. Over the years, I have learned some tips and tricks to getting the best out of photographing your horse!

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1. ANGLES

One of the most important parts of photographing horses is having the correct angle. Keeping your camera lens around shoulder level with the horse will keep their legs from appearing disproportionate. The same goes for shooting head shots as well. No one likes a lens full of horse nose!

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2. BRIBERY

Always have something enticing with you to get the pricked ears and interested expression everyone wants in their photos. Any kind of treats work well, but peppermints or anything that has a wrapper are extra helpful! For horses with a shorter attention span, try crinkling a plastic bag or shaking a small container with coins in it to get them more engaged!

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3. CLEAN UP

Always start with a clean horse! Mud and dirt can ruin an otherwise good photograph. Make sure all your equipment included in the photograph is also clean! They are all important parts of creating a great image.

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4. KEEP IT CLASSY

Having a cheap nylon halter can ruin a photo. Use a leather halter or, even better, a bridle! Leather lead ropes are also a good choice. If you choose a cotton lead rope, use one that isn’t a bright overwhelming color. Stick to neutrals that don’t distract from the horse.

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5. BACKGROUNDS

Find a non-distracting background. When it comes to farms, there is always plenty of distracting elements! Avoid electric fence lines, jumps, buckets, etc. Trees and fields are usually available and always a great go-to.

Now go out and have fun photographing your horses!

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  1. Brianne says:

    I did one session with horses and absolutely loved it! Hoping to do so many more so I’ll have to keep these tips in mind!

  2. Such a gorgeous set of images! 🙂 I love the tips too!

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